ILLNESSOPEDIA

Free Online Database Of Diseases, Illnesses & Ailments

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Here you can look through thousands of and diseases, ailments, medical conditions and illnesses. You can find the symptoms. Read about any ailment's diagnosis and find medications that can be used and the correct treatments that are needed.

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Diseases, Illnesses & Ailments Starting from Letter A


  1. Achondroplastic Dwarfism
    Achondroplastic Dwarfism is a medical condition characterized by the occurrence of the disturbance of the growth of the bones. [read more]

  2. Achromatopsia
    Achromatopsia or ACHM is a condition where the patient is unable to perceive color. Although this name may also be used to refer to acquired defects such as cerebral achromatopsia or color agnosia, it normally refers to a congenital disorder of the vision which is autosomal recessive in nature. It can also be called rod monochromacy or total inborn color blindness. Patients with this kind of disorder manifest total absence of the cone cell activity through electroretinography. At least 4 causes are listed as congenital ACHM: ACHM2 and ACHM3; the third type is a cone photoreceptor transducin called GNAT2, ACHM4; the last cause is still unknown. [read more]

  3. Acid Beta-Glucosidase Deficiency
    Acid Beta-glucosidase deficiency is a rare genetic biochemical defect characterized by the lack of glucocerebrosidase enzyme in the body. This is usually presented by a greater tendency to form bruises, fatigue, femoral head necrosis and an enlarged abdomen. It is sometimes called Gaucher's disease. [read more]

  4. Acid Ceramidase Deficiency
    Acid Ceramidase deficiency, also known as Farber's disease, is a rare infantile disease that is characterized by multiple ceramide containing nodules underneath the skin. These nodules can cause swelling in the abdominal area, painful swelling of arteries and psychomotor retardation. No specific treatment is yet discovered to treat the disease. [read more]

  5. Acid maltase deficiency
    Acid maltase deficiency or AMD is a type of autosomal recessive disorder which is characterized by an extreme buildup of glycogen contained by vacuoles (in almost all cell types) that are lysosome-derived. Quantities of free extralysosomal glycogen that are in excess have also been depicted. AMD was first observed and described by JC Pompe in 1932 at Amsterdam. He reported a case of a baby girl, aged 7 months, who became chronically ill from what they believed to be pneumonia. The autopsy that was done later showed an uncommonly engorged heart but with normal valves. This condition was called cardiomegalia glycogenica diffusa by Pompe. He considered it as a disorder that is analogous to the von Gierke syndrome. This very first article was soon followed by reports that seemed similar. The two other authors described the children as afflicted with cardiomegaly and acute muscle weakness. They died in their early infancy. Their disease was linked to an excess in the deposition of glycogen in numerous tissues. This disorder was then named the Pompe disease and by the year 1957, it was typified as type 2 glycogenosis by GT Cori. [read more]

  6. Acid Reflux
    Acid reflux is a result of the inflammation of the esophagus due to the presence of gastric acid coming from the stomach. It is commonly known as heartburn. Acid reflux can be treated by weight loss management and medications that help reduce gastric acid production, as well as surgical procedures. [read more]

  7. Acidemia, isovaleric
    Isovaleric Acidemia or isovaleric aciduria is an autosomal metabolic illness which prevents or disturbs the normal metabolism of branched-chain amino acid leucine. It is a traditional form of organic academia. [read more]

  8. Acidemia, propionic
    Propionic acidemia also known as propionic aciduria or ketotic glycinemia is an uncommon metabolic disorder which is characterized by the deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase (an enzyme that is involved in breaking down the amino acids). It is categorized as branched-chain organic acidemia which often presents symptoms early on in the neonatal period which comes with progressive encephalopathy. [read more]

  9. Acinetobacter Infection
    Acinetobacter refers to a particular group of bacteria that is commonly found in soil as well as in water. It can also thrive in the healthy skins of people, especially among healthcare personnel, causing all types of diseases. The acinetobacter infection is mostly contracted inside a healthcare facility. [read more]

  10. ACL Injury
    Athletes are more likely to suffer from anterior cruciate ligament injury or ACL, but quite uncommon for the general public who are not subjected to strenuous physical activities. An anterior cruciate is one of the two ligaments that crosses in the middle of the knee, connecting the thighbone and the shinbone. Hard twisting or some sudden stop while landing, running or a direct blow to the knee can injure the ACL. [read more]

  11. Acne
    Acne vulgaris or just acne is a common skin disease which is caused by changes on the pilosebaceous units (structures of the skin which consist of sebaceous gland and a hair follicle). The severe cases of acne are often inflamed but it can also show up as non-inflamed. Lesions are common and they are called spots, zits or pimples. This condition is common during the stage of puberty (affecting about 85% of teeners) while some cases carry on to adulthood. Most acne cases diminish and then disappear over time and this begins during the early twenties of an individual's life. There are no means of predicting when the disease will totally disappear because some cases continue even when the person is already in his thirties or forties. Acne is an altered form of the Greek word akun (or skin eruption). The vernacular name bakne or bacne is used often to specify acne that is found at the back of a person. [read more]

  12. Acne Cystic
    Acne Cystic otherwise known as the nodulocystic acne or the pseudo scars, is a medical condition that refers to an acne that usually developed into a small cysts. [read more]

  13. Acne Excori
    Acne excori?e is another type of acne and is more commonly known as picker's acne since it primarily occurs when the individual picks at the acne lesions. This type of acne is quite common among girls. Emotional problems such as anxiety and depression often accompanies this skin condition. [read more]

  14. Acne Keloidalis Nuchae
    Acne keloidalis nuchae typically develops and affects the back of the head as well as the nape. This is caused by the hairs that grow into skin causing an inflammation and scarring. This condition has been found to be most common among people with curly and stiff hairs. [read more]

  15. Acne rosacea
    Acne rosacea or simply Rosacea is a very common condition which affects over 45 million people all over the world. Although common, it is a misunderstood condition. This often affects white-skinned individuals who are of northwestern European descent. This has been nicknamed as the ‘Celtic curse' by some Irish people. This often begins as mere redness and flushing (erythema) right on the center of the face, also the cheeks, forehead and the nose. It can also affect the chest and the neck. As this disorder progresses, other signs come up such as erythema that is semi-permanent; telangiectasia (or the opening of the surface facial blood vessels); small bumps or domed pustules; reddish gritty eyes, stinging or burning sensations, and the most advanced cases manifest rhinophyma or lobulated nose. This disorder is often confused with seborrheic dermatitis or acne vulgaris. It can co-exist with these two conditions and it can affect both sexes (with females thrice more vulnerable). This peaks on the age of 30 to 60. the primary diagnosis of this disease is mainly facial and when the ears or the scalp become involved, it is a suggestion of a different illness. [read more]

  16. Acoustic Neuroma
    Acoustic neuroma also known as a vestibular schwannoma is a primary intracranial tumor that is benign. This is a tumor of the cells that form myelin of the CN VIII or vestibulocochlear nerve. Neuroma is a derivation of a Greek word which means ‘tumor of the nerve'. The name ‘acoustic' is a misnomer because the tumor hardly occurs from the cochlear or acoustic part of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The precise medical name is vestibular schwannoma. This is because it engages the vestibular part of the eighth cranial nerve and it occurs from schwann cells (the cells that are responsible for the peripheral nervous system myelin sheath). [read more]

  17. Acoustic Neuroma
    Acoustic neuroma is a medical condition that is characterized by the growth of a tumor that usually develops in nerves near the ear. is a benign, usually slow-growing tumor that develops from certain nerves in the inner ear. No one knows exactly what causes acoustic neuroma. As an acoustic neuroma develops, it presses against the nerves related to balance and hearing, causing early symptoms such as: one-sided or high-tone hearing loss, ringing in the ear, dizziness, and problems with balance. Once a diagnosis of acustic neuroma is made, the doctor can describe the available treatment options. [read more]

  18. Acquired Ichthyosis
    Ichthyosis is an inherited disorder of the skin. This disorder is an extreme type of ichthyosis which can afflict both sexes all over the world. When this disease is acquired because of a causal disorder, although, it is very rare; it is still not known how this occurs. But there are studies that claim that it can result from mutations of the genes. The mutated genes can be passed from one generation onto the next. The mutation is believed to cause the abnormality in the skin's standard lifecycle. Normal people shed dead skin cells unnoticed but patients of ichthyosis produce new cells of the skin at a rate where their rate of shedding could not cope. This way, there is a dead skin cell buildup and the patient's skin would then appear to be dry or scaly. Acquired ichthyosis often occurs in adulthood. It could occur before or after a systemic condition diagnosis. [read more]

  19. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome also termed as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a compilation infections and symptoms that result from a specific damage to an individual's immune system. This is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (or HIV) and other similar viruses such as SIV or FIV. The late phase of HIV and AIDS exist to slow down the viral progression. Currently, there is still no cure for this illness. AIDS can be transmitted through direct contacts of the bloodstream or of a mucous membrane with any of the body fluids such as semen, blood, vaginal fluid, breast milk, or preseminal fluid. The modes of transmission could be sexual intercourse, blood transfusion, oral sex, anal sex, or a contact with hypodermic needles that are contaminated with the virus. Another unfortunate means of getting the virus is the exchange of fluids between the baby and its mother during pregnancy. [read more]

  20. Acquired Syphilis
    Syphilis is a venereal medical condition which is and which comes in two categories: acquired or congenital. Acquired syphilis is further divided into sub-categories which are early and late. The early stage consists of the primary, secondary and the early latent less than two years of being infected. The late sub-category is described as late latent greater than two years, tertiary which includes gummatous, neurological and cardiovascular involvement, the two latter forms are also termed as quartenary syphilis. [read more]



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