ILLNESSOPEDIA

Free Online Database Of Diseases, Illnesses & Ailments

  •  

Here you can look through thousands of and diseases, ailments, medical conditions and illnesses. You can find the symptoms. Read about any ailment's diagnosis and find medications that can be used and the correct treatments that are needed.

#    A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Y    Z   


Diseases, Illnesses & Ailments Starting from Letter A


  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), also known as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a serious reaction to various forms of injuries to the lung. This is the most important disorder that is caused by an increased permeability pulmonary edema. ARDS is a severe lung disease caused by different direct and indirect issues. It is marked by inflammation of the lung parenchyma leading to impaired gas exchange with concomitant systemic release of inflammatory mediators causing inflammation, hypoxemia and frequently resulting in multiple organ failure. This condition is life threatening and often lethal, typically requiring mechanical ventilation and admission to an intensive care unit. A less severe form of this disease is called acute lung injury (ALI). ARDS most commonly signified adult respiratory distress syndrome to differentiate it from infant respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. However, as this type of pulmonary edema also arises in children, ARDS has gradually shifted to mean acute rather than adult. The differences with the typical infant syndrome remain the same. [read more]

  2. Acute Sinusitis
    Acute sinusitis is characterized by the inflammation of the nose and nasal passages that interferes with the normal drainage of the mucus in the sinuses. This causes difficulty in breathing with the throbbing sensation across the face, accompanied by headaches, and nagging coughs. [read more]

  3. Acute Toxic Epidermolysis
    Acute toxic epidermolysis is a rare immunological defect that affects the skin. In this condition blisters develop on the skin and causes excessive peeling; the dermis then becomes more exposed to heat and substances and may resort to scalding. [read more]

  4. Acute Tubular Necrosis
    Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular cells that form the tubule that transports urine to the ureters while reabsorbing 99% of the water, highly concentrating the salts and metabolic byproducts. Tubular cells continually replace themselves, and if the cause of ATN is taken out, then recovery is likely. ATN presents with acute renal failure and is one of the most frequent causes of ARF. The presence of "muddy brown casts" of epithelial cells present in the urine during urinalysis is pathognomonic for ATN. ATN may be classified as either toxic or ischemic. Toxic ATN arises when the tubular cells are exposed to a toxic substance (nephrotoxic ATN). Ischemic ATN occurs when the tubular cells do not get adequate amounts of oxygen, a condition they are highly sensitive to due to their very high metabolism. [read more]

  5. ACY2 Deficiency
    ACY2 deficiency is a genetic disorder that features a spongy degeneration of the central nervous system. The signs that indicate the onset of the disease begin at infancy, usually characterized by progressive mental decline and rapid loss of head control, balance and coordination. Patients with the disease have an abnormally large head due to swelling. This disease is caused by an abnormal mutation in the ASPA gene that makes the cells unable to produce an important enzyme for brain and muscle development, aspartocylase. [read more]

  6. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, medium chain, deficiency of
    Medium Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MCADD) is a rare hereditary disease that is the result of the lack of an enzyme required to convert fat to energy. People with MCADD cannot refrain from eating for very long. Fasting starts after the body has used all the food that the person has eaten, then begins to use the body's own fat to make energy. When people with MCADD fast, they can experience a variety of serious life threatening symptoms or even death. Persons with MCADD cannot utilize this fat to make energy, consequently, the body begins to fail and malfunction once the food the person has eaten runs out. [read more]

  7. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of
    Very-Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (VLCADD) is a rare autosomal recessive condition in which the body fails to oxidize fatty acids because an enzyme is either missing or not functioning correctly. Long-chain 3-hydroxy acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (LCHAD) is 1 of 3 enzymatic activities that comprise the trifunctional protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane. The other 2 activities of the protein are long-chain 3-ketoacyl CoA thiolase (LCKT) and 2-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase (LCEH). The protein is an octamer made up of 4 alpha subunits that contain the LCEH and LCHAD activities, and 4 beta subunits that contain the LCKT activity. This enzyme complex helps metabolize long-chain fatty acids, and the LCHAD activity is specific for compounds of C12-C16 chain length. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits have been traced to chromosome 2. Affected infants with LCHAD deficiency, which is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, arise in infancy with acute hypoketotic hypoglycemia. These episodes usually appear for the first time after a fast, which usually occurs in the context of intercurrent illness with vomiting. [read more]

  8. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very short chain, deficiency of
    Short Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (SCADD) is a condition in which the body fails to oxidize fatty acids because an enzyme is either missing or not functioning correctly. Short-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) is a rare condition that stops the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). People affected with this disorder are not able to break down a certain group of fats called short-chain fatty acids efficiently. Some affected infants will display vomiting, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), a lack of energy (lethargy), poor feeding, and failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Other features of this disorder may include poor muscle tone (hypotonia), developmental delays, seizures, and a small head size (microcephaly). The symptoms of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency may be activated by periods of fasting or during illnesses such as viral infections. In some cases, signs and symptoms may not exhibit themselves until adulthood, when some individuals may develop muscle weakness and wasting. Other people with gene mutations that can lead to this disorder may have such mild symptoms that they are never diagnosed. [read more]

  9. Ad14
    Ad14 otherwise known as the Adenovirus Serotype 14 medical condition that is said to be a mutated form of the common cold. [read more]

  10. Addiction
    Addiction was a term used to describe an attachment, devotion, dedication, inclination, etc. Nowadays, however, the term addiction is used to describe a recurring compulsion by an individual to engage in some specific activity, despite harmful consequences to the individual's health, social life, or mental state. The term is often reserved for drug addictions but it is sometimes applied to other compulsions, such as compulsive overeating and problem gambling. Factors that have been suggested as causes of addiction include biological/pharmacological, genetic, and social factors. [read more]

  11. Addison Anemia
    Addison Anemia is a medical condition caused by the malabsorption of Vitamin B-12 and is relatively common form of anemia. [read more]

  12. Addison's Disease
    Addison's disease (also known as chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism or hypocorticism) is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal gland produces inadequet amounts of steroid hormones (glucocorticoids and often mineralocorticoids). It may arise in children as well as adults, and may occur as the result of a large number of underlying causes. The condition is named after Dr Thomas Addison, the British physician who initially described the condition in his 1855 On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules. The adjective "Addisonian" is used for features of the condition, as well as individuals with Addison's disease. The condition is typically diagnosed with blood tests, medical imaging and additional investigations. Treatment is with replacement of the certain hormones (oral hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone). If the disease is the result of an underlying problem, this is addressed. Regular follow-up and monitoring for other health problems is required. [read more]

  13. Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form
    Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form, also known as Christian syndrome or Craniostenosis arthrogryposis cleft palate, is a rare disease that affects multiple systems which causes malformations of the palate, thumbs, and upper limbs. [read more]

  14. Adenitis, Mesenteric
    Mesenteric adenitis is characterized as an inflammation of the mesenteric lymph nodes found in the abdomen. If the inflammation is found in the right lower quadrant, most people would mistake it as appendicitis but is often preceded by sore throat. [read more]

  15. Adenocarcinoma of the lung
    Adenocarcinoma of the lung (or lung cancer) is the leading cause of cancer deaths in both women and men in the United States and throughout the world. Lung cancer has beaten breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. In 2007, 160,390 people were projected to die from lung cancer in the United States, which is more than the number of deaths from colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer combined. Only about 2% of those diagnosed with lung cancer that has spread to other areas of the body are living five years after the diagnosis, although the survival rates for lung cancers diagnosed at a very early stage are higher, with approximately 49% surviving for five years or longer. Cancer arises when normal cells undergo a transformation that causes them to grow and multiply without the normal controls. The cells form a mass or tumor that varies from the surrounding tissues from which it arises. Tumors are dangerous because they take nutrients, oxygen, and space from healthy cells. [read more]

  16. Adenoid cystic carcinoma
    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon form of malignant neoplasm that develops within secretory glands, most commonly the major and minor salivary glands of the head and neck. Other sites of origin include the trachea, lacrimal gland, skin, breast, and vulva. This neoplasm is defined by its characteristic histologic appearance. Adenoid cystic cancer (AdCC) is a very rare type of cancer that can develop in many different body sites. It most often arises in the areas of the head and neck, in particular the salivary glands; but has also been reported in the breast, lacrimal gland of the eye, lung, brain, bartholin gland, and the trachea. It is sometimes known as adenocyst, adenocystic, malignant cylindroma, adenoidcystic, ACC, AdCC. [read more]

  17. Adenoma
    Adenoma is characterized as a collection ogu growth that is glandular in origin. Adenomas usually grow in major body organs such as the adrenal, pituitary, thyroid and colon. These growths are usually benign in nature but can progress into malignant over. While it can be ntbenign, it can also present some potentially serious complications by mass effect and production of large volumes of hormones. [read more]

  18. Adenoma of the adrenal gland
    Adrenal adenomas are categorized as benign or a non-cancerous form of tumour of the adrenal gland. It can arise from the gland's outer layer or what is known as as the adrebal cortez. Ig the adenoma produces hormones, it is considered as a functioning adenoma and non-functioning for adenomas that do not produce hormones. [read more]

  19. Adenomyosis
    Adenomyosis is more popularly known as amenorrhea, and is characterized as a serious health complication among women that consist of the detection of an ectopic endometrial tissue, which normally lines the uterus, are found to extend into the muscular and fibrous tissue of the uterus.There are two known types of adenomyosis–primary and secondary. This disorder may coexist along with external endometriosis. [read more]

  20. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency
    Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency (ADA) is a highly rare genetic disorder and is categorized as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency that largely affects body's immune system. To date, there are only about a dozen documented cases of ADA deficiency. This genetic disease is known to be quite fatal, and often lead to death if afflicted patients do not seek treatment. People who have this disease usually lead a sheltered life and live in enclosed environment to prevent exposure to infectious agents. [read more]



Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

Most Viewed Pages



Recent Searches



Our Visitors Ask About



Medical News